HuffPost

Ambulatory Meat

To overcome our planet’s most pressing problems, we are required to think not as individuals, not even as nations, but as a single humanity

fractal_spheres

We know that our bodies change, our selves change, moods change, dreams change. Everything about a normal, healthy person is in flux. Yet somehow there is a ‘oneness’, a through line, a continuous sense of self. You wonder, how the heck does that happen? Where is this self thing? Where does this idea of recognizing a self come from?
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His fears for the future stemmed from two fundamental convictions: We humans can’t resist selfishly misusing the powers our machines give us, to the detriment of our fellow humans and the planet; and there’s a good chance we couldn’t control our machines even if we wanted to, because they already move too fast and because increasingly we’re building them to make decisions on their own. To believe otherwise, Wiener repeatedly warned, represents a dangerous, potentially fatal, lack of humility.

Can Computers Think?

BeyondTuring_blk2
The Turing Test has long been recognized as the true measure of machine intelligence. Will machines ever be able to answer enough questions to completely fool a human into thinking it is “human”? It is time to stop this notion.

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nevver:

Breathing City
brucesterling:

http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/05/upgrade-our-brains/362057/
theatlantic:

The Communist Manifesto, As a Patent Application

Great books—books that change the way we see the world, books that spur us along our paths as people and cultures—are, in their way, patents. They are innovations made manifest. They are ideas that are claimed by an author on behalf of the rest of us. They are cultural products that concern themselves, when they are at their very best, with hammocks. 
The artist and developer Sam Lavigne has taken these connections to a delightfully logical conclusion. Over at github, he posted a program that renders texts—literary, philosophical—as patent applications. “In short,” Lavigne explains, “it reframes texts as inventions or machines.” 
So! Kafka’s The Hunger Artist becomes “An apparatus and device for staring into vacancy.” Heidegger’s The Question Concerning Technology becomes “A device and system for belonging to bringing-forth.” And—my personal favorite—​The Communist Manifesto becomes “A method and device for comprehending theoretically the historical movement.” 
Read more. [Image: Sam Lavigne]

theatlantic:

The Communist Manifesto, As a Patent Application

Great books—books that change the way we see the world, books that spur us along our paths as people and cultures—are, in their way, patents. They are innovations made manifest. They are ideas that are claimed by an author on behalf of the rest of us. They are cultural products that concern themselves, when they are at their very best, with hammocks

The artist and developer Sam Lavigne has taken these connections to a delightfully logical conclusion. Over at github, he posted a program that renders texts—literary, philosophical—as patent applications. “In short,” Lavigne explains, “it reframes texts as inventions or machines.” 

So! Kafka’s The Hunger Artist becomes “An apparatus and device for staring into vacancy.” Heidegger’s The Question Concerning Technology becomes “A device and system for belonging to bringing-forth.” And—my personal favorite—​The Communist Manifesto becomes “A method and device for comprehending theoretically the historical movement.”

Read more. [Image: Sam Lavigne]

jtotheizzoe:

betype:

The Beauty of Scientific Diagrams by Khyati Trehan.

Thinking of writing everything ever from now on in this typeface.

"The tagline from a recent ad for the ubiquitous Beats by Dre headphones is “Hear What You Want.” This is quietly revolutionary. Today, for the first time in human history, we are not only able to break down the components of what makes a noise noisy; we’re also able to control sonic inputs at the level of the individual human. We’re able to customize our lives with music and podcasts and videos that stream to our ears alone. These playlists are often so intimately calibrated to our desires that even the errant sight of someone else’s soundtrack displayed on a screen—that guy on the bus clicking on to Mumford and Sons’ “I Will Wait”—can seem like a fairly extreme violation of privacy. Earbuds and headphones, though, don’t simply give us access to personalized soundtracks; they also filter out external noises, transforming sound waves from something implicitly communal to something stubbornly personal. As Trevor Pinch, a professor of Science and Technology Studies at Cornell, put it to me: “Sound has become more thing-like—it’s become more mediated by technology.” We may not have earlids; earbuds, however, get us pretty close."

Exactly a century and a half after Charles Dickens and Charles Babbage waged a war on noise, The Atlantic's Megan Garber explores how digital technology is transforming our relationship with sound in a gorgeous feature article.

(Also: Hurray for the reinvestment in long-form journalism!)

(Source: explore-blog)

insteadofwatchingtv:

Science of Marathon Running